David Claerbout

Architecture of Narrative

David Claerbout

David Claerbout, White House (still), 2006; single-channel video projection, dual mono over headphones and speakers, 13 hours, 27 minutes; Rennie Collection, Vancouver; © 2011 David Claerbout

David Claerbout

David Claerbout, The American Room (still), 2009-10; single-channel video projection, dolby digital encoded surround 5.1 channels, 24:29 min.; courtesy the artist and galleries Yvon Lambert, Micheline Szwajcer, Hauser & Wirth; © 2011 David Claerbout

David Claerbout

David Claerbout, The American Room (still), 2009-10; single-channel video projection, dolby digital encoded surround 5.1 channels, 24:29 min.; courtesy the artist and galleries Yvon Lambert, Micheline Szwajcer, Hauser & Wirth; © 2011 David Claerbout

David Claerbout

David Claerbout, Sections of A Happy Moment (still), 2007; single-channel video projection with stereo sound, 25:57 min.; Collection of Aaron and Barbara Levine; © 2011 David Claerbout

David Claerbout

David Claerbout, Sections of A Happy Moment (still), 2007; single-channel video projection with stereo sound, 25:57 min.; Collection of Aaron and Barbara Levine; © 2011 David Claerbout

David Claerbout

David Claerbout, Kindergarten Antonio Sant'Elia, 1932 (still), 1998; single-channel video projection, silent, 10 min.; Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich; © 2011 David Claerbout

May 21 - September 06, 2011

The ambiguous relationships between photography and cinema, stillness and motion, historical past and perpetual present are the subjects and substance of David Claerbout's contemplative video installations. The Belgian artist manipulates cinematic time, often depicting a single moment analyzed from multiple camera perspectives; at SFMOMA he presents a quartet of projections that explore the shifts in attention between the narrative scene in the foreground and the underlying social context of the architectural background. In its U.S. premiere, The American Room (2009-10) constructs and navigates the physical and political space of a formal concert. Also featured are Sections of a Happy Moment (2007) and Kindergarten Antonio Sant'Elia 1932 (1998), both built from photographic images of children's play; and White House (2005), which repeatedly reenacts a 10-minute violent confrontation over the course of a day.