Chris Johanson

Chris Johanson, I Do Not Know But Am Open to Learning, 2013; commissioned by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, courtesy the artist; Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco; Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York; and The Suzanne Geiss Company, New York; © Chris Johanson; photo: Ian Reeves

Chris Johanson

Chris Johanson, Door Sculpture to Talk About the Idea of Different Possibilities You May Have to Process Your Life, 2013; commissioned by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, courtesy the artist; Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco; Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York; and The Suzanne Geiss Company, New York; © Chris Johanson; photo: Andria Lo

Chris Johanson

Chris Johanson, You Have Seen It Before and IHope You See It Many More Times, 2013; commissioned by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, courtesy the artist; Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco; Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York; and The Suzanne Geiss Company, New York; © Chris Johanson; photo: Andria Lo

Chris Johanson

Chris Johanson, Door Sculpture to Talk About the Idea of Different Possibilities You May Have to Process Your Life, 2013; commissioned by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, courtesy the artist; Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco; Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York; and The Suzanne Geiss Company, New York; © Chris Johanson; photo: Andria Lo

Chris Johanson

Chris Johanson, I Do Not Know But Am Open to Learning, 2013; commissioned by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, courtesy the artist; Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco; Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York; and The Suzanne Geiss Company, New York; © Chris Johanson; photo: Ian Reeves

Chris Johanson

Chris Johanson, The Field Became an Orchard Became a House and Became an Orchard (in Los Altos), 2013; commissioned by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, courtesy the artist; Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco; Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York; and The Suzanne Geiss Company, New York; © Chris Johanson; photo: Ian Reeves

Chris Johanson

Chris Johanson, If You Are Open to It You Can Find a Sign That Can Be a Sign, 2013; commissioned by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, courtesy the artist; Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco; Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York; and The Suzanne Geiss Company, New York; © Chris Johanson; photo: Andria Lo

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Chris Johanson

Born in San Jose, 1968; lives and works in Los Angeles

Before Chris Johanson was identified with the Mission School — a close-knit group of San Francisco-based artists who emerged in the 1990s and shared an interest in street culture and folk art — he was a kid growing up in the suburbs of San Jose. His days were spent skateboarding, painting houses, publishing zines, playing music, and designing posters for punk bands. Johanson continues to pursue projects that reflect a DIY ethos and an interest in human relationships, society, and the environment. Often taking the form of brightly colored paintings, drawings, and large-scale installations, his work presents a sincere and direct cosmology of shapes and figures that exude positive energy while questioning their existence and the world around them.

For this exhibition Johanson created a series of outdoor sculptures. In Village Park, a twenty-foot-tall inflatable question mark stitched from mismatched swatches of recycled fabric floats above our heads. In the historic apricot orchard, Johanson wrapped a reclaimed wood door around the base of a tree; appearing old and weathered, it looks as if it predates the roots it surrounds. Three additional doors are situated in Lincoln Park. Vibrantly colored with customized frames and handles, they are each open to different degrees, inviting viewers to walk through them and symbolically offering opportunities for change and testing our willingness to seek it. A quieter intervention is found at First and Shasta Streets. Johanson was taken with the juxtaposition of the word first on the street sign and the stop on the traffic sign below it, and added his own extension of this subtle poetic statement. Behind 242 State Street, a mirror on the building's custom-painted rear facade offers a place for reflection and a reframing of the landscapes we observe.

Jenny Gheith
Assistant Curator of Painting and Sculpture

Interview

Was "AC - testplayer copy"

Chris Johanson on making public sculpture

Visit Information

Location

Five outdoor works by Johanson are installed around downtown Los Altos.

If You Are Open to It You Can Find a Sign That Can Be a Sign
Shasta and First Streets

Door Sculpture to Talk About the Idea of Different Possibilities You May Have to Process Your Life
Lincoln Park

I Do Not Know But Am Open to Learning
Village Park

You Have Seen It Before and I Hope You See It Many More Times
Rear facade of 242 State Street

The Field Became an Orchard Became a House and Became an Orchard (in Los Altos) 
Civic Center Apricot Orchard

Los Altos, CA 94022

Hours

Open daily

Admission

Free
 

For Bay Area transit and traffic information, visit 511.org.

Related


Project Los Altos: SFMOMA in Silicon Valley is organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in collaboration with the City of Los Altos. The lead sponsor of this exhibition is Passerelle Investment Company.

Major support is provided by SFMOMA's Collectors Forum. Generous support is provided by the Bay Area Contemporary Arts Exhibition Fund, founded by Agnes Cowles Bourne; and Brit and Dave Morin. Jim Breyer, Randi and Bob Fisher, Patricia W. Fitzpatrick, Adriane Iann and Christian Stolz, Nion T. McEvoy, and Thomas W. Weisel and Janet Barnes are sponsors of the exhibition. Additional support is provided by the Graue Family Foundation, Alka and Ravin Agrawal, The Black Dog Private Foundation, Phyllis and Bill Draper, Concepción and Irwin Federman, Marissa Mayer and Zachary Bogue, Christopher and Michele Meany, the David and Lucille Packard Foundation, and the Los Altos Community Foundation.

City of Los Altos