Publication

Frank O'Hara review of Bob Rauschenberg, Charles Egan Gallery, New York, 1954–1955

Part of Rauschenberg Research Project Home

  • Frank OHara review of <em>Bob Rauschenberg</em>, Charles Egan Gallery, New York, 1954–1955

    Frank O'Hara, "Bob Rauschenberg," ARTnews 53, no. 9 (January 1955): 47 (ill.); © 1955 ARTnews, LLC (www.artnews.com)

  • Installation view of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection, Charles Egan Gallery, New York, 1954–1955

    Installation view of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection (1954/1955) in Bob Rauschenberg, Charles Egan Gallery, New York, December 1954–January 1955. Photo: Robert Rauschenberg, image courtesy the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

  • Photograph of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection (second state) published in 1961

    Robert Rauschenberg, Collection, 1954/1955. Leo Castelli Gallery Records, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Photo: Rudy Burckhardt, ca. 1961; © Estate of Rudy Burckhardt / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; pictured artwork © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

  • Installation view of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection, SFMOMA, 1978

    Installation view of Collection (1954/1955) in Aesthetics of Grafitti, SFMOMA, April 28–July 2, 1978

  • Detail of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection (verso) showing the abutment of two panels

    Robert Rauschenberg, Collection, 1954/1955 (detail of verso)

  • Photograph of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection prior to 2012 conservation treatment

    Photograph of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection (1954/1955) in 2010, prior to the 2012 conservation treatment of the veil

  • View of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection (verso) showing traces of glue or sizing

    Robert Rauschenberg, Collection, 1954/1955 (verso)

  • View of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection highlighting alterations made after it was first exhibited

    View of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection (1954/1955) with highlighting indicating alterations the artist made after the work was exhibited in Bob Rauschenberg, Charles Egan Gallery, New York, December 1954–January 1955

  • Detail of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection (verso) showing curved wooden element

    Robert Rauschenberg, Collection, 1954/1955 (detail of verso)

  • Views of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection documenting changes in appearance from 1969 to 2013

    Views of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection (1954/1955) documenting changes in appearance from 1969 to 2013. Photos taken in 1969, 1999, 2010, and 2013

  • Detail of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection (verso) showing red wooden element

    Robert Rauschenberg, Collection, 1954/1955 (detail of verso)

  • Detail of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection showing the mirror without the fabric veil

    Robert Rauschenberg, Collection, 1954/1955 (detail)

  • Detail of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection (verso) showing 1964 catalogue number

    Robert Rauschenberg, Collection, 1954/1955 (detail of verso)

  • Details of fabric in Robert Rauschenberg's Collection with a shirt of similar material

    Composite showing details from Robert Rauschenberg's Collection (1954/1955) alongside a shirt created of printed fabric similar to that used in the artwork

  • Detail of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection (verso) showing notation of price

    Robert Rauschenberg, Collection, 1954/1955 (detail of verso)

  • Details of Robert Rauschenberg's Collection (verso) showing fading of fabric

    Composite of two details showing fading of fabric on verso of Robert Rauschenbergs Collection (1954/1955). SFMOMA Conservation Department files

  • Collection

    Robert Rauschenberg, Collection, Sat Jan 01 12:00:00 PST 1955; oil, paper, fabric, wood, and metal on canvas, 80 in. x 96 in. x 3 1/2 in. (203.2 cm x 243.84 cm x 8.89 cm); Gift of Harry W. and Mary Margaret Anderson; © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY


In this review of the exhibition Bob Rauschenberg at Charles Egan Gallery, New York (December 1954–January 1955), Frank O'Hara, a poet and a friend of Rauschenberg's, expresses buoyant enthusiasm for the artist's work. O'Hara offers detailed discussion of specific elements of some pieces, including mention of the bit of gauze covering the mirror in Collection. Although at the time Rauschenberg was still struggling to secure gallery shows and boost sales of his work, O'Hara describes him as the "enfant terrible of the New York School," a moniker that attests to the notice his two previous exhibitions had garnered within the New York art world in the early 1950s.


Transcript