Talk

50 Artists: Caitlin Haskell on Alexander Calder

Related Exhibition Alexander Calder, Part of 50 Artists

Friday, October 14, 2016, noon

Floor 3, Alexander Calder: Motion Lab

This event has come and gone.

Photo: Andria Lo

The thousands of artworks at SFMOMA offer countless opportunities to look closely and think deeply about some of the most amazing artists of our time. To celebrate both the artists on view in the newly expanded museum and the creative communities of the Bay Area, 50 Artists invites local artists and creative professionals to share how icons of modern and contemporary art matter to them. This week, SFMOMA’s Caitlin Haskell, curator of Alexander Calder: Motion Lab, discusses a few of the motivations that led Calder to introduce real motion into his art.

Haskell is assistant curator of painting and sculpture at SFMOMA. A specialist in the art of the early twentieth-century, her interests range broadly across the fields of modern and contemporary art. Since joining SFMOMA in 2012, Haskell has curated or co-curated nearly a dozen exhibitions drawing upon the museum’s collection, including, most recently, the inaugural exhibitions Open Ended: Painting and Sculpture since 1900 (2016) and Alexander Calder: Motion Lab (2016). Currently, she is working with Gary Garrels on the upcoming exhibition Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed, which will debut at SFMOMA in June 2017. She holds a BA in Art from Davidson College and an MA and PhD in Art History from the University of Texas at Austin.

50 Artists: Alexander Calder

The thousands of artworks at SFMOMA offer countless opportunities to look closely and think deeply about some of the most amazing artists of our time. To celebrate both the artists on view in the newly expanded museum and the creative communities of the Bay Area, 50 Artists invites local artists and creative professionals to share how icons of modern and contemporary art matter to them. This week, SFMOMA’s Caitlin Haskell, curator of Alexander Calder: Motion Lab, discusses a few of the motivations that led Calder to introduce real motion into his art.