Exhibition

Exposed

Voyeurism, Surveillance, and the Camera Since 1870

October 30, 2010–April 17, 2011

Investigating the shifting boundaries between seeing and spying, the private act and the public image, Exposed challenges us to consider how the camera has transformed the very nature of looking. Bringing together historical and contemporary photographs, films, and video works by both unknown photographers and internationally renowned artists, this provocative exhibition examines some of the camera’s most unsettling uses, including pornography, surveillance, stalking celebrity, and witnessing violence. Exposed poses compelling and urgent questions about who is looking at whom, and why.

Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance, and the Camera Since 1870 is organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and Tate Modern. Major support for the exhibition is provided by the Trellis Fund and the Phyllis C. Wattis Foundation. Generous support is provided by Linda and Jon Gruber. Additional support is provided by Randi and Bob Fisher, Nion McEvoy, Kate and Wesley Mitchell, Susan Swig, Lucinda Watson, and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy/Consulate of France in San Francisco.

  • A color photograph of a woman wearing a red dress seen from below and behind, Callahan

    Harry Callahan, Atlanta, 1984; collection SFMOMA, Accessions Committee Fund purchase; © Estate of Harry Callahan

  • A black and white photograph of two men kissing on the street, Winogrand

    Garry Winogrand, New York, 1969; collection SFMOMA, gift of Carla Emil and Rich Silverstein; © Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

  • A color photograph of a Caucasian woman seen through a lit window. Yokomizo

    Shizuka Yokomizo, Stranger No. 2, 1999; collection SFMOMA, Accessions Committee Fund purchase; © Shizuka Yokomizo

  • Black and white photograph of actress Greta Garbo with a hand in front of her face, Dudognon

    Georges Dudognon, Greta Garbo in the Club St. Germain, ca. 1950s; collection SFMOMA, Foto Forum purchase; © Georges Dudognon

  • A black and white photograph depicting a Caucasian policeman with a dog barking at an African American man, United Pres International

    United Press International, Suffolk, Virginia, Race Confrontation, May 6, 1964, 1964; collection SFMOMA, Accessions Committee Fund purchase; © United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • A black and white photograph of a group of Caucasian men sitting in an ornate drawing room, Salomon

    Erich Salomon, Hague Conference, 1930; promised gift of Paul Sack to the Sack Photographic Trust of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

  • A sepia toned photograph of a woman strapped to an electric chair, Howard

    Tom Howard, The Electrocution of Ruth Snyder, 1928; collection SFMOMA, Accessions Committee Fund purchase