Performance

Naomi Rincón Gallardo, The Formaldehyde Trip

Thursday and Friday, March 16–17, 2017
8 p.m.

Phyllis Wattis Theater
Please use the Joyce and Larry Stupski Entrance at Minna Street

This event has come and gone.

Naomi Rincón Gallardo, The Formaldehyde Trip, 2016 (still); photo: Fabiola Torres Alzaga

Performance in Progress presents the debut of The Formaldehyde Trip, a live concert and video work by Mexico City-based artist Naomi Rincón Gallardo. The Formaldehyde Trip weaves together Mesoamerican cosmologies, feminist activism and theory, and indigenous women’s struggles for their territories. This new commission imagines the murdered Mixtec activist Alberta “Bety” Cariño in her journey through the underworld where she encounters warriors, witches, and the dual-gendered goddess of death. Rincón Gallardo’s The Formaldehyde Trip is co-curated with Galería de la Raza.

Program notes available here.

Imagining the Future: Race, Language, and Movement in Performance in Progress

Performance in Progress returns March 16–19, 2017, featuring works by Desirée Holman, Naomi Rincón Gallardo, and Jacolby Satterwhite. All three artists’ performances draw on the visuals and narratives of science fiction and fantasy to imagine alternative futures. Here, the scholar Mark C. Jerng describes the artists’ manifestations of an anti-racist future, LeiLani Nishime ponders race-related questions in Holman’s work specifically, and Naomi Rincón Gallardo and Sophia Wang discuss choreography as language.

Naomi Rincón Gallardo in Collaboration

Mexico City–based artist Naomi Rincón Gallardo collaborated with several Bay Area musicians and artists to create her new performance and video work, The Formaldehyde Trip. Learn more about Gallardo and the artists who helped her create the piece’s DIY aesthetics.

Gallardo will be live at SFMOMA September 29–October 2, 2016, as Performance in Progress presents a behind-the-scenes look at The Formaldehyde Trip, a visual album that weaves together Mesoamerican cosmologies, feminist activism and theory, and indigenous women’s struggles for their territories.