Exhibitions at Fort Mason

On View at Fort Mason

Willie Little Nodder Doll

April 4−May 6, 2018
Opening Reception: Wednesday, April 4, 5–7 p.m.
  • metal cage with large rusty chain and small baby figurine on bottom

    Willie Little, Black is the New Orange, 2016; photo: courtesy the artist

  • small gold statue in black box with packaging and dice

    Willie Little, Black Academy Award, 2016; photo: courtesy the artist

  • wooden sculpture covered in american flag remnant

    Willie Little, Dissed, 2017; photo: courtesy the artist

  • painting of young african american girl in white dress

    Willie Little, American Obsession, 2016 (detail); photo: courtesy the artist

Made in Japan in the 1950s, nodder dolls clutched fruits such as bananas, apples, and watermelons for stereotypical comic relief. In his Nodder Doll series, artist Willie Little uses multimedia assemblage and large-scale figurative portrait-like paintings on canvas and wood panel to celebrate, reclaim, and react to the social dilemmas we face today. Little confronts these representations of African American women and purposefully reclaims, re-presents, and ornately embellishes them; to elevate and celebrate their beauty.

To RSVP for the reception, email artistsgallery@sfmoma.org.


Upcoming at Fort Mason

Mirang Wonne + Fumiyo Yoshikawa

May 9−June 10, 2018
Opening Reception: Wednesday, May 9, 5–7 p.m.
  • gold leaf painting with tree branch imagery on beige background

    Mirang Wonne, Gold Trees, 2017; photo: Don Felton, Almac Camera

  • painting with dripping brown gold and beige flower imagery

    Mirang Wonne, Alchemy 5, 2017; photo: Don Felton, Almac Camera

  • gold leaf painting with branch and flower patterns

    Mirang Wonne, Alchemy 4, 2017; photo: Don Felton, Almac Camera

  • Organic abstract painting marks on paper, Fumiyo Yoshikawa

    Fumiyo Yoshikawa, Pieces of Mind #16, 2016; photo: courtesy the artist

  • painting with three layered rectangles and abstract imagery on teal background

    Fumiyo Yoshikawa, Pieces of Mind #13, 2016; photo: courtesy the artist

  • painting with 3 layered rectangles and organic abstract water marks

    Fumiyo Yoshikawa, Pieces of Mind #14, 2016 photo: courtesy the artist

For the last three decades, Mirang Wonne has embodied natural forms in unexpected mediums. She uses primarily industrial materials that paradoxically amplify the organic intensity of those forms, capitalizing on their physical and optical peculiarities. In her recent screen work, Wonne draws on fine stainless steel mesh with a torch. By transforming a material more associated with industry than with art, Wonne achieves results that are unpredictably subtle and intimate, as alluring as gemstones and as transcendent as thoughts.

Fumiyo Yoshikawa uses Japanese brush painting methods nihonga and sumi-e. The traditional brush used in these methods is organic and simple; it’s the perfect tool for her boundless expression. While sumi-e and nihonga are time consuming, and require skilled mastery, the production process is a joyous contemplative journey for Yoshikawa. She is fascinated by the birth and passing of all creatures in the universe, their coexistence, and the infinite cycle of life and death.

To RSVP for the reception, email artistsgallery@sfmoma.org.