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Issues of The Black Panther: Black Community News Service (San Francisco, 1969–76)

Designer and Illustrator: Emory Douglas

Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; April 18, 1970
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; March 27, 1976
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; July 3, 1971
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; July 12, 1969
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; October 11, 1969
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; April 27, 1969
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; July 26, 1969
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; December 27, 1969
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; August 14, 1971
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; March 20, 1976
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; July 6, 1974
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; January 24, 1976
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; May 8, 1971
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; March 9, 1974
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; September 13, 1969
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; April 13, 1974
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; November 22, 1969
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; September 27, 1969
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; April 10, 1976
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; February 7, 1976
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; March 13, 1976
Emory Douglas, The Black Panther: Black Community News Service; February 28, 1976

Selections from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Research Library and Archives

Emory Douglas has been harnessing graphic art as a form of social justice for more than fifty years. Douglas learned graphic design at the City College of San Francisco and later worked as a commercial artist. In 1967, he became the Revolutionary Artist and then Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party and developed the design of the Black Panther newspaper. There, Douglas began featuring more graphic elements, including his illustrations and collages alongside the paper’s reporting on current events and party ideology. Douglas depicted issues faced by Black Americans that were central to the party’s Ten Point Platform and Program, spotlighting abuse and killing by police, incarceration, the right to self-defense, inequalities of the justice system, and solidarity with social justice organizations and international human rights movements. Using the simple tools of paste-up production, Douglas developed an accessible and provocative visual language that has inspired generations of politically engaged artists throughout the world.